Advertising

Specsavers, GAP and more: top creative ads of the week

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In this week’s compilation of creative ads which caught my eye: a TVC spot for Specsavers which has deliberate mistakes, a TVC with some great writing for Arla’s new line of products…and more.

1. Specsavers:eye test

‘Should have gone to Specsavers’ is a brilliant theme for the UK eye-wear brand Specsavers. It has created several memorable spots and brings alive the perils of poor eyesight in each commercial. It is a generic claim but is ownable because the brand name is tightly integrated into the tag line. In a clever new spot in Australia the brand asks the viewer to spot the mistakes in the ad. It is a smart way to ensure attention towards the ad, and gain repeat viewing. There is a reward for entry submission too.

Agency: Cummins & Partners

2. GAP: Wearlight

Most print adverts for fashion brands are about styling and involve the model or a bunch of models staring into the camera. Even in television advertising, it is rare to spot (no pun intended) a fashion brand focused on product features. Here’s an ad for GAP which makes ‘light’ of that challenge.

Agency: In-house

3. Smooth E shampoo: hair loss

Thai advertising is unique. Yes, they have an advantage: unlike India where we have to grapple with creating an idea which cuts across so many languages and regional preferences, they have to create only in one language. But still, we have to admire the consistently great advertising ideas they have produced. Humour plays a big role in their advertising and very often it takes a self deprecating tone. Advertising creators themselves don’t take advertising seriously and often poke fun at the trade. Here’s the latest from Smooth E shampoo which spins an interesting story around hair fall.

Smooth E Shampoo : Suck Lives from Wikorn on Vimeo.

See more great ads from Thailand here, here and here.

4. Arla – Fibre

Here’s some great copywriting for TV. Foods rich in fibre are considered bland. A new range of yogurts from Area which are rich in fibre, attempts to break this notion with ‘for people who can’t be fussed with fibre’ notion. Loved the writing and the droll delivery.

Arla – Fibre – W+K London from Wieden + Kennedy London on Vimeo.

Agency: W+K, London




5. Corona: out of office message generator

Setting up the out-of-office reply is standard practice when one takes a break. Yet, one feels a tad guilty about taking time off and even think of office emails while on holiday. The standard out-of-office reply gets a makeover from Corona beer who’ve set up WoooHooo.com where can customise a fun out-of-office GIF.

 

Agency: W+K, Amsterdam

6. Kiwi: greatness starts with a first step

Loved everything about this campaign: the strategy, research which went into the ads and the execution. A mundane, everyday product like shoe polish cannot be sold only on product features or performance. Brand preference or likeability can be created through advertising ideas like these. Kiwi tracked down details of the shoes worn by Muhammad Ali, Ernest Hemingway, Amelia Earhart and Abraham Lincoln, and crafted these print ads. The writing is wonderful and paints a picture of the struggles of these famous individuals and what made them great.

 

See a hi-res image of the one on Muhammed Ali here.

Agency: Ogilvy, Chicago.

The details in the ad bring a smile and make you nostalgic about the glory days of print advertising.

In the Abraham Lincoln ad:

Leather boots, size 14 (1863). Many men could wear these boots, but only one man could fill them.

[su_note note_color=”#bbe9f9″]Update: Air Asia has updated its famous 2015 print campaign to promote weekday travel with these visually arresting ads. [/su_note]

7. Air Asia: weekday travel

The objective? Promote weekday travel. The idea – a clever twist on a visual representing the monthly calendar.

Agency: BBDO, Bangkok

Which one was your favourite? Comment in.

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A marketing communications professional with a keen interest in all things advertising. I share creative ads and views on the ad industry here. Views are personal. See Disclaimer for more.

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